What is Chlamydia?

Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted infection (STI) caused by a bacteria effecting the genitals, anal, and throat.

Chlamydia can infect both men and women and can cause serious, permanent damage to a woman's reproductive organs.

How do people get chlamydia?

People get chlamydia by having sex with someone who has the infection. “Having sex” means anal, vaginal, or oral sex. People who have had chlamydia and have been treated can get infected again if they have sex with an infected person. Chlamydia is also be passed from mother to child during childbirth.

What are the symptoms of chlamydia?

The most common symptom of chlamydia is NO SYMPTOM of all.

Chlamydia is known as a ‘silent’ infection because most infected people have no symptoms. For those who experience symptoms, they may have discharge that is discolored or yellow-green, bleeding (not their period), burning or itching,  and/or burning and pain during urination.

How do you get tested for chlamydia?

Getting tested is easy! Usually only a urine sample is required.

How is chlamydia treated?

Chlamydia can be easily treated and cured with antibiotics.

Persons with chlamydia should abstain from having sex for seven days after single dose antibiotics, or until completion of a seven-day course of antibiotics, to prevent spreading the infection to partners or reinfection.

What are the risks of untreated chlamydia?

Chlamydia can infect both men and women and can cause serious, permanent damage to a woman's reproductive organs and effect women’s ability to get pregnant.  It also can increase the risk of contracting HIV.

What if I test positive for a chlamydia, but my partner can’t come in for treatment?

The doctor can give you medication to give to your partner. This is called expedited partner therapy. Although, it’s always best for your partner to see a doctor as soon as they can. For more information go to: (http://www.cdc.gov/std/ept/)